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In the News

With state law set to preempt St. Louis minimum wage, groups push for Missouri-wide hike

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While local minimum wage ordinances have become a popular issue among Democratic politicians in many of the country’s big cities, St. Louis’ situation is somewhat unique. Professor Jake Rosenfeld points to the successful 2014 statewide measure raising Arkansas’ minimum wage as an example of the issue’s resonance beyond a liberal base. Professor Steve Fazzari says research is mixed on minimum wage effects. Some papers show big job losses, others show minimal job losses.

One Effort to Close the Gender Pay Gap Won’t Get a Try

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Jake Rosenfeld is quoted in an article discussing the pay gap between white men and almost everyone else and how that could not be solved under Trump.

How Has the Ku Klux Klan Lasted so Long?

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North America’s most notorious racist group, the Ku Klux Klan fought the end of slavery in the 19th century, opposed civil rights in the 20th century and now forms part of a new extreme-right wing movement protesting openly, on America’s streets. Professor David Cunningham answers this pressing question; how has the KKK managed to last so long?

Using Confederate monument controversies in St. Louis and elsewhere as a teaching tool

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Professor David Cunningham answers about how he has hosted conversations about diversity, inclusion and conflict resolution with children and others in their lives.

The roots of racism and hate groups

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Professor David Cunningham discusses the violence in Charlottesville and the white supremacist movement – its roots, its supporters, its growth and its political power.

Are Universities Enabling Sexual Harassment and Assault?

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Over the last year, several news stories have surfaced describing allegations of sexual assault against professors. While the details varied, the general outlines of the stories were pretty much the same: women who were graduate students or junior faculty accused tenured male faculty members of sexual harassment and/or sexual assault.

Why everyone should know how much you earn

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Over the last decade, the gap between what American women earn compared to their male counterparts has hovered around 20 percent — that is, for every $1 a man gets, a woman gets 80 cents. Towards this topic, professor Jake Rosenfeld shows just how persistent that culture of secrecy remains.

2017’s Best & Worst States for Working Moms

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Women make up nearly half of the U.S. workforce, and more than 70 percent of moms with young children are working. Yet women earned only 82 percent of what men made in 2017 and have far less upward mobility, as evidenced by the fact that only 5.2 percent of S&P 500 companies’ chief executives are female.

A Proposal for Public Sociology as Localized Intervention and Collective Enterprise: The Makings and Impact of Invisible in Austin

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What can local public sociology look like, and what does it accomplish? This essay tracks the origins, makings and impacts of the book Invisible in Austin to evaluate its model of public sociology: as a collective enterprise with a local aim.

The Model Minority Myth

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Professor Adia Harvey Wingfield answers "how the model minority myth hurts people at work": racism affects the professional potential of Asian people from the time they become students. While Korean, Chinese and Japanese people have made it part-way into managerial ranks, Hmong, Laotian, Cambodian, and Filipino Americans remain overrepresented in low-wage jobs.

British Companies Must Reveal How They Pay Women vs. Men

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At the current rate of progress, it could take nearly a century before the gender pay gap is closed in Britain. So the government is trying to speed up the process. Professor Jake Rosenfeld's finding that salary transparency raised wages, in part because “even being cognizant of gender pay disparity” can change norms is quoted.

Making Sense of Klansville

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When conducting research on this chapter of history for his acclaimed book Klansville, Professor David Cunningham encountered the work of a journalist named Pete Young, who in the 1960s attempted to understand what was happening in North Carolina. He shares some of this history and describes how Young's insights could hold lessons for today.