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Welcome to WashU: Q&A with Tim Bartley

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Timothy Bartley's specializations include global political economy and governance, environment and sustainability standards, and work and labor standards. He joined the sociology department this fall as a professor. As part of our ongoing series highlighting new faculty, we asked Bartley about his forthcoming book, his transition to St. Louis, and what's next.

Full employment in the United States? Not for many women

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With jobless rates at a two decade low, the United States is nearing full employment — but women are not reaping the full benefit, due to a lack of childcare options. Professor Caitlyn Collins says that the US has the most inhospitable family policy of any country in the developed world.

Record expansion of U.S. hate groups slows under Trump administration

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As President Donald Trump prepares to offer his first State of the Union address, a new analysis by a Washington University in St. Louis sociologist may explain why the pronounced, decades-long expansion of U.S.-based hate groups has slowed to a crawl during the first year of his administration.

Would You Be My Neighbor?

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Using survey data, sociologist Ariela Schachter has investigated how Americans think about race, immigration status, assimilation, and what it means to be ‘similar.’ She discusses her process and findings.

Moms at Work: Policies and Perspectives in Europe and the US

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Professor Caitlyn Collins now investigates how public policies affect family life in both Europe and the US. She shares some of her findings on the laws and cultural attitudes that shape women's careers and lives.

With state law set to preempt St. Louis minimum wage, groups push for Missouri-wide hike

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While local minimum wage ordinances have become a popular issue among Democratic politicians in many of the country’s big cities, St. Louis’ situation is somewhat unique. Professor Jake Rosenfeld points to the successful 2014 statewide measure raising Arkansas’ minimum wage as an example of the issue’s resonance beyond a liberal base. Professor Steve Fazzari says research is mixed on minimum wage effects. Some papers show big job losses, others show minimal job losses.

One Effort to Close the Gender Pay Gap Won’t Get a Try

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Jake Rosenfeld is quoted in an article discussing the pay gap between white men and almost everyone else and how that could not be solved under Trump.

How Has the Ku Klux Klan Lasted so Long?

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North America’s most notorious racist group, the Ku Klux Klan fought the end of slavery in the 19th century, opposed civil rights in the 20th century and now forms part of a new extreme-right wing movement protesting openly, on America’s streets. Professor David Cunningham answers this pressing question; how has the KKK managed to last so long?

Using Confederate monument controversies in St. Louis and elsewhere as a teaching tool

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Professor David Cunningham answers about how he has hosted conversations about diversity, inclusion and conflict resolution with children and others in their lives.

The roots of racism and hate groups

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Professor David Cunningham discusses the violence in Charlottesville and the white supremacist movement – its roots, its supporters, its growth and its political power.

Are Universities Enabling Sexual Harassment and Assault?

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Over the last year, several news stories have surfaced describing allegations of sexual assault against professors. While the details varied, the general outlines of the stories were pretty much the same: women who were graduate students or junior faculty accused tenured male faculty members of sexual harassment and/or sexual assault.

Why everyone should know how much you earn

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Over the last decade, the gap between what American women earn compared to their male counterparts has hovered around 20 percent — that is, for every $1 a man gets, a woman gets 80 cents. Towards this topic, professor Jake Rosenfeld shows just how persistent that culture of secrecy remains.