In the News

Rosenfeld and Denice on pay secrecy

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Although U.S. employers cannot legally prohibit employees from discussing their pay, many employers implement a formal or informal policy against employees discussing their salaries. Such policies help employers maintain complete control over wages, thus preventing employee demands for higher pay and wage equality, according to a 2015 study by Jake Rosenfeld and Patrick Denice, two of the few sociologists to study pay secrecy.

Robinson on the intersection of race and banking

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In the past few weeks, black-owned banks have gotten a huge boost from a movement called #bankblack, with thousands of new accounts opened and assets that have grown by as much as $6 million. Professor John Robinson says that the 1977 Community Reinvestment Act had a major impact on black-owned banks, funneling much of their previous business toward larger, whiter banks.

Jake Rosenfeld the prospects for a right-to-work law in Missouri

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Missouri will become a right-to-work state. The chief question is how soon the General Assembly will put a version of the anti-union measure on the desk of soon-to-be Gov. Eric Greitens. Professor Jake Rosenfeld who has studied the effect of right-to-work laws for more than a decade said that its restrictions don’t have to be devastating for unions, if they adapt.

Mark Rank on how poverty and economic stress affect the change in US death rates

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Greater stress and anxiety resulting from economic insecurity may be at least partly to blame for the U.S. death rate that the government announced Dec. 8 has increased for the first time in a decade, says an expert on poverty and inequality at Washington University in St. Louis.

Schachter on undocumented immigrants, socioeconomic mobility, and racial and legal barriers

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In new research, which surveyed more than 1,350 native-born, non-Hispanic White Americans, Ariela Schachter finds that compared to US-born and naturalized citizens, and legal immigrants, Americans are far less likely to wish to have undocumented immigrants as neighbors.

Cunningham quoted in My Strange Afternoon Among Anti-Fascists Waiting for the KKK to Show Up

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Professor David Cunningham says that when you have economic decline alongside a broad and dynamic civil rights movement, it becomes very easy for people to think their economic disenfranchisement comes at the hands of minorities. As the KKK has been marginalized and other extremist groups have co-opted its original rhetoric, it has turned into something of a relic.

Harvey Wingfield quoted in "For students, protests are about more than just Trump"

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Professor Adia Harvey Wingfield distinguishes between the awareness that the world may be a more dangerous place and a simple emotional response to a surprise result. The uptick in hate crimes and threats against ethnic and religious minorities, as well as immigrant and LGBT communities following Trump’s victory, suggest that there is an increased risk for these individuals today

Harvey Wingfield on Trump's Rhetoric and Stereotypes

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The election of Donald Trump has shocked many. But for Adia Harvey Wingfield, professor of sociology in Arts & Sciences, the candidate’s rhetoric was all too familiar and revealed the stubborn persistence of ugly racial and gender stereotypes.

Fazzari on Trump's Economic Views: Some Symptoms Right, Diagnosis Wrong

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Professor Steven Fazzari's Trump economic analyze: get symptoms right, but diagnosis wrong: Donald Trump’s economics gets a couple of things right ... and that’s why you should vote for Hillary Clinton.

Fazzari on infrastructure spending

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Anyone who reads op-ed pages could have noticed a recent shift in economic debate: More and more experts saying that monetary policy has shot its bolt and it’s time to crank up government spending on things like roads and bridges to spur growth. Professor Steven Fazzari shares the view that the Fed is out of ammunition.

Harvey Wingfield on wider pay gaps faced by people of color

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Extensive research shows that even when controlling for factors like education, skill, and experience, women routinely earn less than men employed in the same professions. Professor Jake Rosenfeld shows that the decline in unionization has worsened the racial wage gap, particularly for black women working in the private sector.

Harvey Wingfield on racial wage gap

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Valerie Wilson of the Economic Policy Institute and Adia Harvey Wingfield of Washington University in St. Louis discuss a new study finding a greater racial wage gap in 2015 than in 1979. They talk now about an economic trend that is getting some attention, the wage gap between white Americans and black Americans.