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Cunningham quoted in My Strange Afternoon Among Anti-Fascists Waiting for the KKK to Show Up

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Professor David Cunningham says that when you have economic decline alongside a broad and dynamic civil rights movement, it becomes very easy for people to think their economic disenfranchisement comes at the hands of minorities. As the KKK has been marginalized and other extremist groups have co-opted its original rhetoric, it has turned into something of a relic.

Harvey Wingfield quoted in "For students, protests are about more than just Trump"

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Professor Adia Harvey Wingfield distinguishes between the awareness that the world may be a more dangerous place and a simple emotional response to a surprise result. The uptick in hate crimes and threats against ethnic and religious minorities, as well as immigrant and LGBT communities following Trump’s victory, suggest that there is an increased risk for these individuals today

Harvey Wingfield on Trump's Rhetoric and Stereotypes

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The election of Donald Trump has shocked many. But for Adia Harvey Wingfield, professor of sociology in Arts & Sciences, the candidate’s rhetoric was all too familiar and revealed the stubborn persistence of ugly racial and gender stereotypes.

Fazzari on Trump's Economic Views: Some Symptoms Right, Diagnosis Wrong

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Professor Steven Fazzari's Trump economic analyze: get symptoms right, but diagnosis wrong: Donald Trump’s economics gets a couple of things right ... and that’s why you should vote for Hillary Clinton.

Fazzari on infrastructure spending

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Anyone who reads op-ed pages could have noticed a recent shift in economic debate: More and more experts saying that monetary policy has shot its bolt and it’s time to crank up government spending on things like roads and bridges to spur growth. Professor Steven Fazzari shares the view that the Fed is out of ammunition.

Harvey Wingfield on wider pay gaps faced by people of color

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Extensive research shows that even when controlling for factors like education, skill, and experience, women routinely earn less than men employed in the same professions. Professor Jake Rosenfeld shows that the decline in unionization has worsened the racial wage gap, particularly for black women working in the private sector.

Harvey Wingfield on racial wage gap

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Valerie Wilson of the Economic Policy Institute and Adia Harvey Wingfield of Washington University in St. Louis discuss a new study finding a greater racial wage gap in 2015 than in 1979. They talk now about an economic trend that is getting some attention, the wage gap between white Americans and black Americans.

Sociology Major/Minor Approved

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For over 25 years, no Washington University student has had the choice to major or minor in sociology. Starting this year, that’s about to change. The department, which returned to the Danforth Campus last year after being disbanded in 1991, has recently concluded the process of approving its major and minor and can begin enrolling students into the programs.

Rosenfeld says right to work laws definitely hurt organized labor

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A new study could fuel conflict in Missouri’s upcoming election for governor. The future of labor unions hangs in the balance in the battle between Republican Eric Greitens and Democrat Chris Koster. Professor Jake Rosenfeld is behind the study, which contends the decline of unions effectively lowers wages for non-union workers.

Collins on Hillary Clinton and U.S. sick leave policy

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As Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton demonstrated when she nearly collapsed from the effects of walking pneumonia early this week, the benefits of running for elected office may include many things, but sick days are not among them. Professor Caitlyn Collins says these figures reflect a widespread American bias that “valorizes work and the ideal worker image” at the expense of personal health and well-being.

Faculty of Color and the Changing University

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Despite the excuses that administrators often give, a commitment to diversity can go beyond lip service and translate into more faculty of color in tenure-track, tenured, full professor and upper administrative ranks, argues Adia Harvey Wingfield.

Schachter's From “Different” to “Similar”: An Experimental Approach to Understanding Assimilation

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Professor Ariela Schachter uses a nationally representative conjoint survey experiment to explore whether and how immigrants’ mobility gains shape native-born white citizens’ perceptions of symbolic belonging and finds that white natives are generally open to structural relationships with immigrant-origin individuals, with the exception of black immigrants and natives, and undocumented immigrants.