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Sociology Major/Minor Approved

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For over 25 years, no Washington University student has had the choice to major or minor in sociology. Starting this year, that’s about to change. The department, which returned to the Danforth Campus last year after being disbanded in 1991, has recently concluded the process of approving its major and minor and can begin enrolling students into the programs.

Rosenfeld says right to work laws definitely hurt organized labor

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A new study could fuel conflict in Missouri’s upcoming election for governor. The future of labor unions hangs in the balance in the battle between Republican Eric Greitens and Democrat Chris Koster. Professor Jake Rosenfeld is behind the study, which contends the decline of unions effectively lowers wages for non-union workers.

Collins on Hillary Clinton and U.S. sick leave policy

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As Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton demonstrated when she nearly collapsed from the effects of walking pneumonia early this week, the benefits of running for elected office may include many things, but sick days are not among them. Professor Caitlyn Collins says these figures reflect a widespread American bias that “valorizes work and the ideal worker image” at the expense of personal health and well-being.

Faculty of Color and the Changing University

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Despite the excuses that administrators often give, a commitment to diversity can go beyond lip service and translate into more faculty of color in tenure-track, tenured, full professor and upper administrative ranks, argues Adia Harvey Wingfield.

Schachter's From “Different” to “Similar”: An Experimental Approach to Understanding Assimilation

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Professor Ariela Schachter uses a nationally representative conjoint survey experiment to explore whether and how immigrants’ mobility gains shape native-born white citizens’ perceptions of symbolic belonging and finds that white natives are generally open to structural relationships with immigrant-origin individuals, with the exception of black immigrants and natives, and undocumented immigrants.

Rosenfeld on stagnant wages

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Anemic gains in wages have plagued U.S. workers not just since the Great Recession ended seven years ago but for years before it as well. The underlying factors vary, but research just out suggests that a major culprit is lost in the noise over jobs going offshore, immigration and the minimum wage.

Rosenfeld on the how the decline of unions has effected nonunion workers

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There’s this notion out there that unions are great for union members, and that’s pretty much it. But a new report from the Economic Policy Institute looks at how the decline in labor unions has affected nonunion workers. Professor Jake Rosenfeld says that strong unions mean higher wages for both union members and nonmembers.

Jake Rosenfeld and Patrick Denice report on union and nonunion wages

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Pay for private-sector workers has barely budged over the past three and a half decades. In fact, for men in the private sector who lack a college degree and do not belong to a labor union, real wages today are substantially lower than they were in the late 1970s.

Adia Harvey Wingfield on building a more inclusive workplace

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In 10th grade, Adia Harvey Wingfield took her first sociology course. “It changed my life,” she says. “It really spoke to me and had a real impact on how I thought about a lot of things.” She also was interested in the dynamics of race that she saw playing out as she grew up in 1980s post–civil rights North Carolina.

Caitlyn Collins on supporting working moms

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Moms get—better than anyone—that we can’t have everything running smoothly all at once. But in the U.S., where working mothers have some of the most inadequate
support systems in the world, we still feel guilty when we can’t do it all. Professor Caitlyn Collins sayas that the United States has the most family-hostile public policy of any country in the developed world

Jake Rosenfeld on gender pay

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Professor Jake Rosenfeld on New York Times: similar to a provision in the Massachusetts new law, California recently passed legislation that prohibits employers from penalizing workers who discuss wages and salaries.

Jake Rosenfeld's research cited on unions and voter turnout

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THE white working-class men who are planning to vote for Donald J. Trump this November have been called many things: xenophobic, racist, misogynist, dangerously naïve. But even if those descriptions are true, it doesn’t mean these men were fated to be Trump supporters. Professor Jake Rosenfeld's report is quoted in this issue.