Adia Harvey Wingfield

​Professor of Sociology
PhD, Johns Hopkins University
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  • WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
  • CB 1112
  • ONE BROOKINGS DR.
  • ST. LOUIS, MO 63130-4899
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​Professor Wingfield specializes in research that examines the ways intersections of race, gender, and class affect social processes at work.

Adia Harvey Wingfield is Professor of Sociology at Washington University in St. Louis. Her research examines how and why racial and gender inequality persists in professional occupations. Dr. Wingfield has lectured internationally on her research in this area, and her work has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals including Social Problems, Gender & Society, and American Behavioral Scientist. She recently completed a term as President of Sociologists for Women in Society, a national organization that encourages feminist research and social change, and is a regular contributor to Slate, The Atlantic, and Harvard Business Review. Professor Wingfield is the author of several books, most recently Flatlining: Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy, and is the recipient of the 2018 Public Understanding of Sociology award from the American Sociological Association. 

Yes We Can?: White Racial Framing and the 2008 Presidential Campaign

Yes We Can?: White Racial Framing and the 2008 Presidential Campaign

This book offers one of the first sociological analyses of Barack Obama's historic 2008 campaign for the presidency of the United States. Elaborating on the concept of the white racial frame, Harvey Wingfield and Feagin assess the ways racial framing was deployed by principal characters in the 2008 election. This book counters many commonsense assumptions about race, politics, and society, particularly the idea that Obama's election ushered in a post-racial era. Readers will find this book uniquely valuable because it relies on sound sociological analysis to assess numerous events and aspects of this historic campaign.

Yes We Can?: White Racial Framing and the Obama Presidency

Yes We Can?: White Racial Framing and the Obama Presidency

The first edition of this book offered one of the first social science analyses of Barack Obama’s historic electoral campaigns and early presidency. In this second edition the authors extend that analysis to Obama’s service in the presidency and to his second campaign to hold that presidency. Elaborating on the concept of the white racial frame, Harvey Wingfield and Feagin assess in detail the ways white racial framing was deployed by the principal characters in the electoral campaigns and during Obama’s presidency. With much relevant data, this book counters many commonsense assumptions about U.S. racial matters, politics, and institutions, particularly the notion that Obama’s presidency ushered in a major post-racial era. Readers will find this fully revised and updated book distinctively valuable because it relies on sound social science analysis to assess numerous events and aspects of this historic campaign.

Doing Business With Beauty: Black Women, Hair Salons, and the Racial Enclave Economy

Doing Business With Beauty: Black Women, Hair Salons, and the Racial Enclave Economy

Black women comprise one of the fastest-growing groups of business owners in the United States. In Doing Business with Beauty, sociologist Adia Harvey Wingfield examines this often-overlooked group and one of the most popular businesses run by these entrepreneurs: hair salons. Using in-depth interviews with hair salon owners, Doing Business with Beauty explores several facets of the business of owning a hair salon, including the process of becoming an owner, the dynamics of the owner-employee relationship, and the factors that steer black women to work in the hair industry. Through Harvey Wingfield's research we can understand the black female business owner's struggle for autonomy and her success in entrepreneurship.

Changing Times for Black Professionals

Changing Times for Black Professionals

This book is a study of the challenges, issues, and obstacles facing black professional workers in the United States. Though they have always been a part of the U.S. labor force, black professionals have often been overlooked in media, research, and public opinion. Ironically, however, their experiences offer a particularly effective way to understand how race shapes social life, opportunities, and upward mobility. As the 21st century continues to usher in increasing demographic, social, and economic change to the United States, it is critical to consider the impact this will have on an important sector of the labor force. In this book, I examine the reasons why sociological study of black professional workers is important and valuable, review the literature that examines their experiences in the workplace, and consider the issues and challenges they are likely to face in a rapidly shifting social world.

No More Invisible Man: Race and Gender in Men's Work

No More Invisible Man: Race and Gender in Men's Work

The 'invisible men' of sociologist Adia Harvey Wingfield's urgent and timely No More Invisible Man are African American professionals who fall between extremely high status, high profile black men and the urban underclass. Her compelling interview study considers middle class, professional black men and the challenges, obstacles, and opportunities they encounter in white male-dominated occupations. No More Invisible Man chronicles these men's experiences as a tokenized minority in the workplace to show how issues of power and inequality exist - especially as it relates to promotion, mobility, and developing occupational networks. Wingfield's intersectional analysis deftly charts the ways that gender, race, and class collectively shape black professional men's work experiences. 

No More Invisible Man: Race and Gender in Men's Work

No More Invisible Man: Race and Gender in Men's Work

The "invisible men" of sociologist Adia Harvey Wingfield's urgent and timely "No More Invisible Man" are African American professionals who fall between extremely high status, high-profile black men and the urban underclass. Her compelling interview study considers middle-class, professional black men and the challenges, obstacles, and opportunities they encounter in white male-dominated occupations. "No More Invisible Man" chronicles these men's experiences as a tokenized minority in the workplace to show how issues of power and inequality exist--especially as they relate to promotion, mobility, and developing occupational networks. Wingfield's intersectional analysis deftly charts the ways that gender, race, and class collectively shape black professional men's work experiences. In its examination of men's interactions with women and other men, as well as men's performances of masculinity and their emotional demeanors in these jobs, "No More Invisible Man" extends our understanding of racial- and gender-based dynamics in professional work.