In the News

Adia Harvey Wingfield presents "The Persistent Problem of the Color Line: Researching Race in the 21st Century" at the 2018 Gender and Work Symposium

| Read Story

Adia Harvey Wingfield, Professor of Sociology at Washington University in St. Louis, presents "The Persistent Problem of the Color Line: Researching Race in the 21st Century" at the 2018 Gender and Work Symposium.

Americans Love Seeing Swedish Dads Out With Their Kids

| Read Story

Professor Caitlyn Collins comments on the attitude of the Americans when they see Swedish dads out with their kids. She points out that this reveals the gender equality problem in the U.S.

Young Hispanic men may face greatest risk from police shootings, study finds

| Read Story

The police shooting earlier this month of Stephon Clark in his grandmother’s Sacramento backyard has renewed protests over officer-involved deaths of unarmed black men, but research led by Washington University in St. Louis suggests young Hispanic men may face an even greater risk of being killed by police, especially in mixed-income neighborhoods with large Latino populations.

The Refugee Detectives

| Read Story

Professor Ariela Schachte's finding that native-born white Americans view immigrants negatively if they think the immigrants are “illegal” is quoted in the article discussing refugees' issues.

National Debt Hits Historic High

| Read Story

Department Chair Steve Fazzari becomes the guest of "National Debt Hits Historic High" by Gretchen Brown, discussing the issues of the growing national debt after the recent action in Congress.

WashU Experts: Retail giants Dick’s, Walmart regulate where politicians won’t

| Read Story

Two U.S. retailers made moves this week to regulate their gun sales based on principle — moves that legislators failed to make in recent years despite public outcry following each incident in a line of mass-shooting tragedies. A pair of Washington University in St. Louis experts say that these actions represent “an expansion of corporate social responsibility.”

Trump tariffs are based on flawed view of trade

| Read Story

President Donald Trump likes to talk about the trade deficit as if it were the score of a football game — with the home team, of course, losing. Department Chair Steve Fazzari expresses his opinion towards Trump's view of trade and tariff.

Rules Without Rights: Land, Labor, and Private Authority in the Global Economy

| Read Story

This book is about the idea that transnational corporations can push these standards through their global supply chains, and in effect, pull factories, forests, and farms out of their local contexts and up to global best practices.

Right-to-work holdouts face new efforts to change labor laws

| Read Story

Missouri’s new law will go to a statewide referendum in November, while a pair of Republican lawmakers in Ohio announced last month they want to put the issue before voters in two years. Professor Jake Rosenfeld comments on this issue.

Police kill unarmed blacks more often, especially when they are women, study finds

| Read Story

Blacks, especially women, are more likely to have been unarmed when killed by police than non-blacks, and that risk appears to increase in police departments with a greater presence of non-white officers, according to a new study of nationwide data from Washington University in St. Louis.

Does Labor Have a Death Wish?

| Read Story

Among union households, Professor Jake Rosenfeld and Washington University postdoc Patrick Denice pointed out in an April blog post, fully 6 percent said they voted for neither Trump nor Clinton, which in most cases likely means they voted for Johnson or Stein.

Racism Is Stopping Black Men From Solving Our Nursing Shortage

| Read Story

Professor Adia Harvey Wingfield argues that for some men, gendered ideas about work can make entering a field like nursing very difficult. These beliefs persist even when labor market conditions shift so that male-dominated jobs become more scarce. Racism is stopping black men from solving our nursing shortage.